Blog topic: Secure Your Computer

Happy Data Privacy Day!

Sorry, folks, I don’t have any cake to share for this celebration, but don’t let that stop you from participating in Data Privacy Day. There are practical things you can do today, and every day, to protect your personal information. Here are a few scenarios where people may share more information than they intend.

Image of computer connecting to Wi-Fi

Is that gadget internet-connected?

When we think of being connected to the internet, mobile phones, tablets and computers pop to mind. But lots of things are connected these days. Refrigerators, fitness wrist bands, smoke detectors and even light bulbs could have digital sensors that transmit information about you to other objects, databases or people over the internet.

For 2015 — resolve to back up your digital life

What’s worse than losing all the photos and important files on your computer? Knowing you could have prevented it.

Back it up

What to know about webcam hackers

Have you seen news reports about foreign websites showing live feeds from unsecured wireless cameras — like nanny cams, baby monitors, and security cameras — in the U.S. and around the world? It’s creepy stuff, but there are steps you can take to protect your camera from prying eyes.

IP camera

FTC cracks down on tech support scams

“Your computer is damaged ... we’ll help you fix it.” It’s the latest twist on tech support scams: Scammers sell software online that claims to increase your computer’s performance. They lure you to their websites with pop-up ads or web searches. Then, they tell you to call a phone number to activate or register the software. On the phone, they ask for remote access to your computer and then tell you that your computer has many errors that need to be fixed immediately.

Free pizza? Nope — just free malware

It’s Pizza Hut’s 55th anniversary, the email says, and you can join in the celebration by getting a free pizza at any of its restaurants. Just click on the “Get Free Pizza Coupon” button.

Don’t do it. There’s no free pizza. Clicking on the coupon will just install malware on your computer.
 

FTC publications — free and at your fingertips

When you want free consumer information — for yourself or a group — the FTC is ready to take your order. Looking for identity theft brochures to share with your book club? We’ve got them. Online safety handouts to use in the classroom? Right here. Bookmarks about charity fraud to distribute at a community fair? Absolutely. Our new and better bulkorder site is your gateway to almost 200 free publications for consumers and businesses.

October means Halloween… and National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Happy October! Along with fall foliage, sweater weather, and shorter days, you’ve probably noticed Halloween-themed candy and décor lining store shelves. While the start of October may remind us that the spookiest day of the year is just around the corner, it also kicks off National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM).

National Cyber Security Awareness Month reminds everyone to practice safe online habits — not just this month, but throughout the year. We have resources to help.

Computer Security Video

It’s Game Over for Gameover Zeus

The Department of Justice recently announced a multinational law enforcement effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus Botnet.

What is it and why care about it? Gameover Zeus is malware designed to steal banking and other credentials from home and business computers.

“Pending FTC complaint” emails are fakes

Have you gotten an email with the subject line “Pending consumer complaint” that looks like it came from the FTC? The email warns that a complaint against you has been filed with the FTC. It asks you to click on a link or attachment for more information or to contact the FTC.

These emails pull out all the stops to look official: They have an FTC seal, references to the “Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCPA)” and a “formal investigation,” and what look like real FTC links. The truth is that they’re fakes.

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