Blog topic: Protect Kids Online

Call me maybe?

School’s out and your kids have days overflowing with fun and free time. You might be at the amusement park concessions while they’re riding the SuperVomitron Adventure Ride. Or maybe they’re at the pool bellyflopping with friends. Whatever the kids are up to, many parents like being able to stay in constant contact by getting them a mobile phone. If so, it’s time to teach them to think about safety and responsibility when using it.

International collaboration to protect children’s privacy

The Federal Trade Commission and 27 members of the Global Privacy Enforcement Network (GPEN), a group of privacy enforcement agencies around the world, are marshaling resources to protect the privacy of children online.

Privacy matters

Did you know that May 3-9, 2015 is Privacy Awareness Week? It’s an initiative of the Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities Forum.

Privacy Awareness Week highlights the importance of protecting your personal information. This year’s theme is Privacy Matters — a message we promote year-round at the FTC. Whether you’re at home, work, school, or a doctor’s office — there are things you can do to help keep your information private and safe.

Privacy matters image

Does that ABC app track your child?

Your young child is playing an educational app with cute cartoon characters. It’s teaching her letters, shapes, and numbers. But did you know that while your child is learning her ABCs, someone else could be learning where your child is?

FTC publications — free and at your fingertips

When you want free consumer information — for yourself or a group — the FTC is ready to take your order. Looking for identity theft brochures to share with your book club? We’ve got them. Online safety handouts to use in the classroom? Right here. Bookmarks about charity fraud to distribute at a community fair? Absolutely. Our new and better bulkorder site is your gateway to almost 200 free publications for consumers and businesses.

Working together to prevent bullying

Did you know that in addition to October being National Cyber Security Awareness Month, it’s also National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month?

In recognition of the efforts to improve school climates and reduce rates of bullying nationwide, the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention are proud to release a variety of resources aimed at informing youth, those who work with youth, members of the media, parents, and schools. Find these resources at Stopbullying.gov.

October is Bullying Prevention Awareness Month! Learn More!

Kids under 13 can’t Yelp it

If you have children under 13, do you know about COPPA — the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act? Websites and services covered by COPPA must get your consent before they collect personal information from your child, and they must honor your choices about how that information is used.

That’s why Yelp — the online review service — is getting less than five stars from the FTC.

COPPA logo

Let’s talk about online safety

The new school year is in full swing and National Cyber Security Awareness Month is around the corner. What better time to talk to the kids in your life about online safety. Many of our readers are doing just that — and using Net Cetera: Chatting with Kids About Being Online as the basis for the conversation.

Over 1 million copies of the new Net Cetera have been distributed throughout the U.S. since January 2014. Time and time again, our readers have told us they think Net Cetera is a valuable tool.  

 

Kids’ in-app spending on Android? Parents didn’t app-rove

Ever hand your smartphone over to your kids? You probably didn’t think it could be a hundred-dollar decision — but for some parents, it was.

Today the FTC announced that Google is settling charges that it allowed kids to spend money in apps without their parent’s permission.

Playing with Fire

Ready for a discussion that’s likely to upset the whole family? First, explain these concepts to your four-year-old: online shopping accounts that are linked to your credit card, unlimited in-app charges, and store policies that state all sales final. Then, explain how the virtual coins your child uses in a game can cost real money charged instantly to your account. Sounds like fun, right?

The experience has been anything but fun for parents whose children racked up hundreds of dollars playing “free” games on the Kindle Fire.

kids playing on tablet

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