Data Privacy: Taking It Personally

Quick. In 2012, what was the number one complaint submitted to the FTC?

You guessed it: Identity theft. And it has been the number one complaint for 13 years straight.

That makes Data Privacy Day the ideal time to think about how you can protect your identity.

Latanya Sweeney, the FTC’s Chief Technologist, recently told us that something as simple as an online resume could be a treasure trove for identity thieves. It turns out that a web search can reveal the names, Social Security numbers, and birthdates of thousands of people because this information appears in many online resumes.

So what can you do?

Be strategic about what you include in your resume. For example, don’t include your Social Security number or date of birth; include your age and home address only if you must.

What else can you do to protect your identity?

Want more tips? Check out this video for five to-do’s to make protecting your identity part of your everyday routine.

 

Blog Topic: Be Smart Online

Comments

I take the privacy act seriously.

thanks for the info.

Thank you.

I am really tired of people that have nothing better to do besides finding different ways of causing problems for other people online or stealing from them!! I do not know about everyone else but I cannot afford a lot of money for many different security programs so that I can read my emails, get on Facebook to catch up on how my distant family members are doing, or to do research. This is rediculous!! There needs to be ONE PROGRAM that can protect us from these people and that it be free of charge or the fee be very low and affordable for all to allow us to protect ourselves from these horrid persons.

good

Should have red flags on them sites that ask for your personal info in place before you sign up on that site it would be nice to see a flag before you make that mistake

I use a free app,(donation's accepted) WOT. Web of Trust. It is a useful app that alerts you to suspicious sites and sites that are reported for unsavory practices. You can review reports and decide to, or to not go to them. Check it out. It's just another way to protect your online browsing. Whatever it takes!

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