Tag: online safety

In October 2009, the Federal Trade Commission and OnGuardOnline.gov released the first edition of Net Cetera: Chatting with Kids About Being Online, a guide to help parents and other adults talk to kids about being safe, secure, and responsible...

Scammers, hackers, and identity thieves are looking to steal your personal information – and your money. But there are steps you can take to protect yourself, like keeping your computer software up-to-date and giving out your personal information...

When your kids begin socializing online, you may want to talk to them about certain risks: Inappropriate conduct: The online world can feel anonymous. Kids sometimes forget that they are still accountable for their actions. Inappropriate...

Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing...

Cyberbullying is bullying or harassment that happens online. It can happen in an email, a text message, a game, or on a social networking site. It might involve spreading rumors or images posted on someone's profile or passed around for others to...

The security of your computer can affect the safety of your online experience — and your kids’. Talk to your kids about what they can do to help protect your computer and your family’s personal information. Teaching...

If you're concerned about what your kids — especially elementary school kids — see when they surf the internet, there are tools to consider using. Keep in mind that while parental controls work well for young children, teens who've been online for...

When very young children start using a computer, they should be supervised closely by a parent or caregiver. Parents may wish to choose the websites their kids visit early on — and not let them leave those sites on their own. If little kids aren't...

Teens are forming their own values and beginning to take on the values of their peers. As they mature, many are eager to experience more independence from their parents. Teens are closing in on becoming adults, so they need to learn how to exercise...

Tweens (kids ages 8 to12) begin exploring more on their own. They need to feel "independent," but not alone. It's important to be with them — or at least nearby — when they're online. Consider keeping the computer in...

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